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After announcing that the COVID vaccine would be made mandatory to the Australian public, PM Scott Morrison backtracked his comment by saying that it would be “encouraged”, and not compulsory.

 

Earlier today, Australian PM Scott Morrison stated the promising vaccine that is being developed by AstraZeneca and the Oxford University, is in a very promising stage and should be “as mandatory as you can possibly make it”. Australia has secured access to this vaccine and has claimed that it will be offering free doses s and when it arrives.

 

With several governments around the world facing flak from anti-vaxx groups and a large-scale skepticism relating to the COVID vaccine, Scott Morrison’s statement on mandatory vaccination invited quite a negative response.

On Wednesday morning, Morrison stated that the aim was to get 95% of the population to take the vaccine and that he was “expecting” that it would be compulsory, except on valid medical grounds.

“I would expect it to be as mandatory as you can possibly make, we’re talking about a pandemic that has destroyed the global economy and taken the lives of hundreds of thousands all around the world and over 430 Australians. So, you know, we need the most extensive and comprehensive response to this to get Australia back to normal,” Morrison said in a recent radio interview.

A statement that hit the wrong chord with some of the patrons that heard it, Morrison took to correcting his words by afternoon. Changing his language by clarifying to the radio channel his intentions of “encouraging” the ingestion of the vaccine, he took a step back from his previous comment.

“We can’t hold someone down and make them take it,” the prime minister said.

With several conspiracy theories floating across social and mainstream media, across the globe, there has also been a wave of misinformation surrounding the potential vaccines.

The coronavirus has now affected over 22 million people around the world, with a  continuous and rapid rise in cases across the United States, Brazil, and India. More than 777,000 people have lost their lives and a lot of countries are pinning their hopes on potential vaccines.

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Avrumy Schwartz

Author Avrumy Schwartz

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