There’s no need to painstakingly open each image to expand it on Twitter anymore. On Wednesday, after successfully testing the uncropped image feature for quite some time, Twitter officially rolled out the widened aspect ratio for Tweets with photos. 

According to the new update, Twitter for Android or iOS will now display standard aspect ratio images (16:9 and 4:3) in full without any cropping. The Twitter timeline will now showcase pictures as you’ve shot them, without cropping them. 

Source: Twitter

In its announcement of the new feature, Twitter wrote, “Sometimes it’s better said with a picture or a video. Over the next few weeks, we’ll be testing some ways to improve how you can share and view media on Twitter.” In a follow-up Tweet, the social media giant revealed how your timeline would now look, writing, “Now testing on Android and iOS: when you Tweet a single image, how the image appears in the Tweet composer is how it will look on the timeline –– bigger and better.”

“Today’s launch is a direct result of the feedback people shared with us last year that the way our algorithm cropped images wasn’t equitable,” Twitter spokesperson Lauren Alexander said. The new way of presenting images decreases the platform’s reliance on automatic, machine-learning-based image cropping.

This being said, what several users are most excited about, is seeing memes without having to open the image to check out the punchline. On the other hand, visual artists like photographers and cartoonists who promote their work on Twitter are also happy with the feature since not only will photos and other kinds of art score more real estate on the timeline but artists can be sure that they’re putting their best tweet forward without awkward crops that don’t show their work in full glory. Now, you no longer need to try and calculate exactly the right dimensions to ensure that users can see your attached image in the timeline.

Twitter’s new system will show anyone sharing an image a preview of what it will look like before it goes live in the timeline, resolving past concerns that Twitter’s algorithmic cropping was biased toward highlighting white faces.

 

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Rhea Sovani

Author Rhea Sovani

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